James Bridle

James Bridle, My delight on a shining night (still), 2018 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

James Bridle, My delight on a shining night (still), 2018 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

James Bridle, My delight on a shining night (still), 2018 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

James Bridle, Autonomous Trap 001 (still), 2017 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

At a time when fears about global surveillance, artificial intelligence and algorithmic bias have become increasingly acute, artist and writer James Bridle asks critical questions about our relationship with technology and the invisible flow of data that surrounds us. In his work, Bridle suggests that instead of regarding AI as a master, we should see it as a teacher and a guide to the other, natural, but largely unrecognised intelligences which also surround us. He pursues this theme in his film, Se ti Sabir (2019) and investigates the convoluted histories of digitally tracked bird migrations in the hand-written text, Abdf (2018).

 

James Bridle‌ ‌(born‌ ‌1980,‌ ‌London)‌ ‌lives‌ ‌and‌ ‌works‌ ‌in‌ ‌Athens,‌ ‌Greece.‌ Bridle‌ ‌studied‌ ‌at‌ ‌University‌ ‌College ‌London.‌

James Bridle, Autonomous Trap 001 (still), 2017 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

Technology forces us to deeply reconsider how we understand the world, and that, I think, is its most powerful value.

 – James Bridle

 

 

James Bridle, Se ti sabir (still), 2019 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

James Bridle, Se ti sabir (still), 2019 © the artist. Courtesy the artist
James Bridle, Se ti sabir (still), 2019 © the artist. Courtesy the artist

Presented in

Aberdeen





James Bridle, Se ti sabir (still), 2019 © the artist. Courtesy the artist